Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Default Simple treatment for Keratosis Pilaris on face

    No cure is available for keratosis pilaris on face. However, the condition can be managed to a great extent with regular skin care and certain prescription medications. Such medications include topical retinoids, ammonium lactate cream, and moisturizers containing urea and topical corticosteroids. These topical creams and lotions can help to soften the dry and rough skin patches, caused by keratosis pilaris. Even exfoliating the skin with urea and glycolic or salicylic acid containing lotions, and exfoliators can help to remove the dead skin cells, and soften the affected area. However, scrubbing the face vigorously in order to get rid of dead skin cells can aggravate the condition. So, the skin affected by keratosis pilaris needs to be treated gently.


  2. #2

    Default

    I just want to add this one. I found this in an article.

    "there is no cure, only treatments. Unfortunately the treatments my dermatologist offered me did not offer much help. After doing much reading and research on Keratosis Pilaris, I have found that most doctors will tell sufferers the same things. The most common treatment I have heard and read is to use a buff-puff or a loofah sponge, and then apply a lotion like Am Lactin or Lac Hydrin. I used these lotions and they did not work at all for me.

    Usually when these do not work, doctors will prescribe a cream that has a high level of Retin-A in it. I used some of this and it did help, but not as much as I’d hoped. Even so, without insurance, this medicine can be outrageously expensive. I first used samples to see if it worked for me, and the tubes that I had were very small. So small that between applying to my arms and my legs, I could only get 2 applications out of one tube! This means I would need a tube a day. I took one of the tubes to my pharmacy and asked if the prescription tubes were larger or the same size as the sample tubes. The pharmacist said the prescription tubes were exactly the size of the sample tube. Then I warily asked him the price on one tube (which was one day’s worth of application for me and it’s to be used daily) and I almost fainted when he told me. One tube, one day’s application, was $40! Yes, you heard me right, $40! Well if I needed a tube a day, and it was to be applied every single day, there was no way I was buying this stuff. Especially if it only helped my problem…not solving it! So unless you have magnificent insurance, watch out for the Retin-A creams, they are very expensive.

    After becoming very frustrated with the doctor’s recommendations and treatments, I decided to find a treatment of my own. I began to try different things here and there until I found one that has worked great for me. All people with Keratosis Pilaris may not find relief in the same treatments, but I’m going to tell you what worked for me. This has to be followed exactly in order to see any results!

    - First I use a thick loofah sponge or buff-puff on the affected areas. I do this daily and I only use Dove Nutrium Body Wash with my sponge. I have tried several moisturizing body washes, and this one has proven to be the best for me. It is a dual formula that contains a gentle cleanser and a moisturizing lotion at the same time. It works great. When using the sponge, scrub as hard as you can on the affected area, and in a circular motion. Exfoliation is very important, especially since the affected areas are so dry. (Note: Dove has also recently come out with a Dove Nutrium Bar! So now I use both, and they are great. They make my skin so soft and silky, and the moisturizers are very good for the keratosis pilaris.)

    - After I exfoliate with this body wash, I then apply an over the counter lotion that has worked wonders for my keratosis pilaris. Neutrogena makes this lotion and it’s called “Multi-Vitamin Acne Treatment”. I know what you are thinking; keratosis pilaris is not acne. No it’s not, but for some reason this stuff works. In my reading and research on the subject, I ran across a treatment that recommended using a moisturizer that contained a small amount of salicylic acid. This product contains both. It is full of vitamins and moisturizers that are great for your skin, and it also contains this salicylic acid. If you apply this lotion right after you have scrubbed with the Dove Nutrium, it will give you results within 2 or 3 days. It did for me!

    - I also apply the Neutrogena Multi Vitamin Acne Treatment at night before going to bed. So I am applying it twice a day, once after showering and exfoliating, and once at bedtime.

    - Adding a humidifier in your bedroom will also help to clear your skin. The moisture will hydrate your dry skin while you sleep at night and help in clearing up the keratosis pilaris.

    - This next “treatment” is one I have found on my own and doctors do not recommend it. I am not telling anyone to do this, I am simply telling you what has worked in clearing up my skin condition. Tanning in the sun or in a tanning bed/salon. I like to tan anyway, so by trial and error I found that it cleared my skin. I started going to a tanning bed 2 or 3 times a week at first, and then dropped down to once a week. Each time I would tan for 12 to 15 minutes. That is not a lot of exposure, and it cleared my skin better than ANYTHING else I have ever done. I still have occasional problems with my arms, but my legs cleared right up and those bumps have never returned to this day, and I have not tanned in over 6 months. So I am very pleased with these results. "

  3. #3
    vencasand's Avatar
    **Brenda** Female

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    CARROLL CO. MD
    Posts
    1,755

    Default

    tanning beds are so dangerous. my daughter who is now 39 was diagnosed with basil cell carcinoma when she was 35. she used a tanning bed all the time. she had two affected places. one between her breasts and the other on her hip. the first question the surgeon asked her was did she tan in a tanning bed!! please be careful.

  4. #4

    Default

    Try a lotion or cream containing Lactic acid, such as AmLactin cream. It's an over-the-counter cream and costs around $20-$25 depending on location and deductible costs.

    Before you shower, put some petroleum jelly (or Vaseline; they're the same thing) on the affected area. The steam of the shower will hydrate your skin while the Vaseline protects.

    Use a washing, exfoliating method (i.e.: loofa, buff-puff, or exfoliating gloves) to scrub the affected area in circular motion while showering. If the bumps are on your arms, you may skip this exfoliating step entirely, but it depends on you.

  5. #5

    Default

    Keratosis pilaris is a skin disorder it appears as a small red bumps on the upper part of the arms, thighs and on face. Oils are good for your skin. You can try coconut oil for softening your skin.


    • Advertisers

      Adsense

      Name:Google Adsense
      Location: USA
      Status: Advertiser
      Mood: Cheerful

      Online

      ______________________________
      This advertising will not be shown to register members.
      Register your free account today and become a member on DermaTalk
       

Similar Threads

  1. my sister has keratosis pilaris
    By vencasand in forum Keratosis
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-01-2012, 10:17 AM
  2. Skin tags & Keratosis Pilaris
    By pika_doh9 in forum Keratosis
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-01-2012, 10:15 AM
  3. I have Keratosis pilaris,please help
    By rajeev in forum Keratosis
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-06-2011, 07:54 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-04-2010, 07:06 AM
  5. Keratosis pilaris and eczema
    By Susan35 in forum Eczema and Dermatitis
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-03-2009, 12:42 AM

Tags for this Thread



About DermaTalk

    DermaTalk is an Skin Care Advice forum and message board dedicated to people for sharing Skin related issues and experiences with community members and get suggestions from expert.

Quick Links



This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.

Stay Connected

Twitter Facebook RSS Feed